Values and moral development in the classroom

March Volume 60 Number 6 Creating Caring Schools Pages Moral Teachers, Moral Students Rick Weissbourd Schools can best support students' moral development by helping teachers manage the stresses of their profession and by increasing teachers' capacity for reflection and empathy.

Values and moral development in the classroom

Denise Hawkins Being a teacher is an inherently moral endeavor—but do enough educators truly understand the moral value of their work? Osguthorpe, dean of the College of Education at Boise State University, would like to see more teachers who understand the moral value of what they do and teacher education programs that are prepared to show them how.

I realized then, that in order to teach French well, I needed to develop relationships with students and show them that I cared about them as people. Preparing and Supporting Practitioners with Matthew N. Sanger, spoke recently with NEA Today. Matthew Sanger and I conceptualize the moral work of teaching as the aspects of teaching practice that are inherently connected to the moral domain—any issue that relates to what is good, right, virtuous, and caring in our personhood, actions, and relationships with others.

These issues include those that are connected to the teacher being a morally good person, as well as to the teacher having an impact on the moral development of students. Why focus now on the moral work of teaching?

Perhaps the most powerful reason for focusing on the moral work of teaching in teacher education is that teaching is inherently moral—thus, the moral work of teaching cannot be avoided. Teacher education ought to attend to the commitments, values, and beliefs that teacher candidates bring with them into the teacher education classroom.

Thus, helping teacher candidates understand these aspects of their future work are paramount to helping them realize the moral outcomes they anticipate experiencing in their future classrooms.

We can prepare teachers for this work by helping them understand that moral values infuses their work; helping them to engage in their practice in ways that align with what we call good, virtuous, and caring.

Guiding Students' Moral and Emotional Growth

If a teacher education program purports to prepare teacher candidates for the profession, and if it has a constructivist bent, then the moral work of teaching must be addressed in meaningful ways.

But it must also continue, as a part of in-service teacher professional development. Seeking a deeper understanding of teaching practice and connecting that understanding to quality improvement will always be integral to the education of teachers.

What does or should that preparation entail and look like?

Teaching Strategies: The Importance of Morality

That preparation could take on a lot of different forms. It might be something connected to pro-social development for students. It could be as simple as developing a classroom that is caring or having their sense of fairness, justice, and caring infuse the process of grading.

Whether or not they can go into the classroom and impact the moral development of children, some would say, yes and some would say, no. But we can say that the school does have an impact.

Values and moral development in the classroom

Having a teacher equipped to engage in that work is pretty important. But whatever form that preparation takes, it should be purposeful, systematic, and thematically driven. One argument for being concerned with the moral work of teaching rests on the assumption that teachers are not able to check their dispositions and moral character at the classroom door.

The dispositions that they bring into the classroom infuse and inform all activities of teaching, from how teachers interact with students in the hallway to the way that they deliver instruction, grade papers, set rules for conduct, and on and on.How to Apply Kohlberg's Theory in the Classroom By Pilar Ethridge ; Updated June 28, Lawrence Kohlberg's theory on moral development can be applied to the classroom where rules, standards, and consequences are concerned.

Moral Teachers, Moral Students Rick Weissbourd Schools can best support students' moral development by helping teachers manage the stresses of their profession and by increasing teachers' capacity for reflection and empathy.

Values and moral development in the classroom

The moral development of students does not depend primarily on explicit character education efforts but on the maturity and ethical capacities of the adults with whom they interact—especially parents, but also teachers, coaches, and other community adults.

Character Education in the Classroom is a course at Teacher Education Institute (TEI) that examines the role of educators in developing moral and ethical behavior in students by assisting teachers in defining and identifying character traits that .

Moral development "concerns rules and values about what people should do in their interactions with other people."(Santrock, ) Both Piaget and Kohlberg did extensive observations and interviews with children and adolescents on the topic of moral development.

One of the major purposes of values education is to help students develop more complex ways of reasoning--to facilitate cognitive development. The purpose of moral education in a cognitive developmental framework becomes the stimulation of the student's capacity for . Creating a Culture of Integrity in the Classroom Students develop academic honesty when you build their moral vocabulary, respond appropriately to cheating, use meaningful quotes, and inspire them to . How to Apply Kohlberg's Theory in the Classroom By Pilar Ethridge ; Updated June 28, Lawrence Kohlberg's theory on moral development can be applied to the classroom where rules, standards, and consequences are concerned.

The classroom is an ideal laboratory in which students can test hypothetical situations and potential consequences. Teachers must recognize the cognitive abilities of those in their class and maximize these abilities through problem-solving activities.

Being an effective moral educator is no easy task.

The 'Moral Value' of Teaching: The Missing Link in Teacher Preparation? - NEA Today